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A new acquisition for the collections Our Learning Officer Anna Darron has tried her hand at specimen preservation - capturing the spirit of Christmas 2013 for future study!  Happy Holidays from the Hunterian Museum! :)

A new acquisition for the collections

Our Learning Officer Anna Darron has tried her hand at specimen preservation - capturing the spirit of Christmas 2013 for future study!

Happy Holidays from the Hunterian Museum! :)

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jennyeart:

Oil pastel Skull drawings  Huntarian museum - London

jennyeart:

Oil pastel Skull drawings
Huntarian museum - London

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georgecolley:

View from the Hunterian Museum in the freezing cold

georgecolley:

View from the Hunterian Museum in the freezing cold

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Drawings exploring the traces of life/existence.

I began to view the specimens as sculptures in their own right.

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Here is my drawing and the story of one of my favourite specimens/exhibits – The two headed boy from Bengal.  Born in 1783 to a poor farming family, the boy had a difficult time of things from the very beginning. Due to his appearance he was thrown into a fire shortly after his birth by a terrified midwife, he sustained burns to head and face however managed to survive.  His parents quickly realised that this terror could also make them money so he was exhibited as a freak. He was covered by a sheet until the price was right (sometimes for hours at a time) and then he would be revealed to his audience. His fame spread quickly across India to the point where private viewings were bought and appearances were arranged for private parties so that guests could have close up examinations of the boy.  Sadly regardless of all this attention, none of it was medical. There are no recorded medical examinations of the boy and press attention was far more focused on his freak status than the cause of this condition.  Although the boy survived a less than pleasant life it was cut short by the unlikeliest of things, a cobra bite. At age four he died and only at this point was he medically examined. He was buried near Boopnorain River however this was not the end of his troubles.  Mr Dent a salt agent for the East India Company took it upon himself to rob his grave. He dissected the boys remains and the skull was brought to England. When the head was dissected it was discovered that not only were the skulls conjoined, but inside were two separately functioning brains.  The skull now finally rests and can now be seen in The Huntarian Museum, London. 
For more drawings visit facebook.com/deskofthedead

Here is my drawing and the story of one of my favourite specimens/exhibits – The two headed boy from Bengal.

Born in 1783 to a poor farming family, the boy had a difficult time of things from the very beginning. Due to his appearance he was thrown into a fire shortly after his birth by a terrified midwife, he sustained burns to head and face however managed to survive.

His parents quickly realised that this terror could also make them money so he was exhibited as a freak. He was covered by a sheet until the price was right (sometimes for hours at a time) and then he would be revealed to his audience. His fame spread quickly across India to the point where private viewings were bought and appearances were arranged for private parties so that guests could have close up examinations of the boy.

Sadly regardless of all this attention, none of it was medical. There are no recorded medical examinations of the boy and press attention was far more focused on his freak status than the cause of this condition.

Although the boy survived a less than pleasant life it was cut short by the unlikeliest of things, a cobra bite. At age four he died and only at this point was he medically examined. He was buried near Boopnorain River however this was not the end of his troubles.

Mr Dent a salt agent for the East India Company took it upon himself to rob his grave. He dissected the boys remains and the skull was brought to England. When the head was dissected it was discovered that not only were the skulls conjoined, but inside were two separately functioning brains.

The skull now finally rests and can now be seen in The Huntarian Museum, London.

For more drawings visit facebook.com/deskofthedead

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I am looking at the trace/existence of life within my work. I began to view the specimens as sculptures in their own right.

I am looking at the trace/existence of life within my work. I began to view the specimens as sculptures in their own right.

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